Hebrew

The Hebrew language has had a profound impact on the entire spiritual modern world as it represents the infrastructure of the three major religions of the world today. The genesis of Judaism, Christianity and Islam saw their foundations birthed from the Scriptural canon of the Old Testament. The original tongue of the Holy Scriptures is Hebrew.

The transformation from pictorial expression to written communication is a science that has taken on many facets as linguistics scholars have sought to show how language has developed since the world’s inception until now. While written communication has developed from ancient hieroglyphics and cuneiform into more sophisticated writing systems it becomes difficult to determine which language has had the greatest impact on the world today.

From a spiritual standpoint the Hebrew language is the linguistic system that has left the most lasting impression as it represents the infrastructure of the three major religions of the world today. The genesis of Judaism, Christianity and Islam saw their foundations birthed from the Scriptural canon of the Old Testament. The original tongue of the Old Testament is Hebrew.

If your goal is to understand and follow the path left by GOD through scriptural reference or if you are a student of the Bible seeking to unlock the mysteries therein the original tongue of the Bible remains the key. It was important for ancient scholars to learn to translate the hieroglyphics to better understand Egyptian culture; the same for the ancient societies that communicated through cuneiform writing. So, it is with the original Hebrew. To gain the true essence of the message that GOD has for mankind it is important to embrace the Holy Scriptures through the Hebraic understanding of its mother tongue.

Read More On The Hebrew Language

Hebrew, as identified by linguistics is affiliated with the Afro-Asiatic language family of languages due to the similarities to many languages spoken in Northern and North Eastern Africa.  This linguistic group is vastly different than Yiddish, which contains heavy Germanic similarities.  Even though Hebrew and Yiddish use the same characters, there are very few, if any linguistic similarities.  Yiddish is from the Indo-European linguistic group.

The Hebrew language, in its written form, has a few features that are distinct from many other languages.  The first distinction is that Hebrew has a different alphabet.  This alphabet has undergone a few changes throughout the centuries.  The original or ancient Hebrew alphabet, also know as the paleo-Hebrew, are derived from the alphabetic characters found in Phoenician writings.  This written from is widely considered to be the alphabet system used until the destruction of the first Temple in 586 BCE.

Use of the modern or block alphabet characters date back to Persian rule in the late 6TH century when Aramaic became the dominant language of the region.  The modern block characters are what is used in most printed Hebrew documents today.

The cursive Hebrew form of writing that was developed between the 6TH and 11TH century BCE.  The system was developed to facilitate writing on a secular level.

In Hebrew, diagrammatic marks act as vowels and those marks used in the proper pronunciation of Hebrew words.  It is important to note that original Hebrew text did not contain vowels.  However, improper pronunciation can cause a misunderstanding between two speakers.

Another distinction is that Hebrew is written and read from right to left.

Behold how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity,

It is like the precious ointment upon the head, that ran down upon the beard: that went down to the skirts of his garments.

As the dew of Hermon, and as the dew that descended upon the mountains of Zion; for there the LORD commanded the blessing, even life for evermore.

– Psalms 133



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